Shippers eye struggling retail properties for conversion to last-mile, fulfillment centers

Dive Brief:

  • Retail to industrial real estate conversions are on the rise, according to a CBRE report released Thursday. The firm is tracking 59 such projects that are underway or have been completed since 2017, 35 of which have launched since January 2019 alone, totaling 15.5 million square feet of converted industrial space.
  • The trend has been driven by consumers moving away from mall-based and big-box retail, and it was accelerated by a mass shift to online shopping during the coronavirus outbreak. As e-commerce grows in popularity, fulfillment and last-mile delivery volumes are steadily increasing, prompting shippers to seek warehouse space closer to their customers. The top five markets for retail facility conversions are Milwaukee, Cleveland, Chicago, Dallas/Ft. Worth and Omaha, Nebraska, according to the report.

For the full story, please click HERE

Source: Supply Chain Dive

Maersk to charge fee starting in September for shippers manually booking, amending documents

Dive Brief:

  • Maersk will charge a fee to shippers who handle booking or documentation amendments manually (through email, fax, phone or chat) beginning Sept. 1 for the United States and Canada, the carrier told customers in an advisory last week, according to a copy provided to Supply Chain Dive.
  • A Manual Booking Amendment Fee of $50 will apply for every amendment to a booking Maersk receives through a manual channel, and the Manual Documentation Amendment fee of $75 will apply to every amendment to the Bill of Lading Maersk receives through a manual channel, according to details provided by Maersk.
  • “The intention is not to use the fee as a revenue generator but rather to change customer behavior and use Maersk.com which in turn will improve and simplify their experience with 24/7 service,” according to the carrier, which said it receives about 6,000 emails and phone calls every week “from a significant number of shippers” related to manual amendments.

For the full story, please click HERE

Source: Supply Chain Dive

OOCL second-quarter revenues up, volumes down

Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL) said that although second-quarter volumes were down 4.6% year-over-year, total revenues increased 1.1%.

OOCL’s parent company, Orient Overseas (International) Ltd. (OOIL), covered the second quarter of 2020 in a one-paragraph overview dated Friday.

According to the release, second-quarter revenues totaled $1.58 million. Average revenue per twenty-foot equivalent unit (TEU) increased 5.9% compared to the same period last year.

OOCL said loadable capacity decreased by 6.4% year-over-year. The overall load factor was 1.6% higher than the same period in 2019.

OOCL typically provides little or no commentary in its earnings releases. Its second-quarter release was no different.

For the full story, please click HERE

Source: American Shipper

Savannah volume down just 1% and total tonnage a record

A small dip can be a big win during a pandemic, when global supply chain disruptions have taken huge bites out of volumes at U.S. ports.

So the Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) announcement Monday that fiscal-year volume at the Port of Savannah was down by less than 1% compared to the previous year wasn’t bad news.

The Port of Savannah handled 4.44 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in fiscal year 2020, which ended June 30.

And the GPA found good news where it could. It said that despite coronavirus-caused supply chain disruptions, total tons crossing all its docks reached a record 37.77 million, up 0.6% or 223,000 tons compared to fiscal year 2019. Container tons grew 2% or 56,440 tons to hit another record with 33.5 million tons.

For the full story, please click HERE

Source: American Shipper

Taiwan Launches its Largest-Ever Research Vessel

Taiwan named its new marine research vessel the New Ocean Researcher 1, built at a cost of approximately  $50 million. It is an ocean-class multi-functional ocean research vessel and Taiwan’s largest ocean research ship. The ship is the third new research vessel launched by Taiwan to undertake marine exploration and research, as well as teaching marine science.

The two other research vessels, the 500-ton New Ocean Researcher 2 and the New Ocean Researcher 3 were delivered to the government in 2019. The chairman of Taiwan Shipping Company, where the ships were built, Zheng Wen-lung highlighted that most of Taiwan’s shipbuilding ships are commercial container ships or bulk carriers.

The construction of research ships was commissioned by the Ministry of Science and Technology and features several distinctive features. This ship is equipped with an energy-saving sword bow developed in Taiwan. The lateral appearance of the bow is different from the traditional bulbous bow. The design can reduce the wave resistance that lowers the ship’s speed in rough seas. The shape also reduces the chances of waves breaking over the bow.

For the full story, please click HERE

Source: The Maritime Executive